Buckaroo John's Blog

Bishop Mule Days

Posted by John Brand on

This week we head to Bishop, California for the famous Bishop Mule Days Celebration. There's something quite magical about Mule Days. It almost takes you back to a more simple time, where our lives were more connected to the animals around us. There is something about pulling into Bishop and seeing the snow capped Eastern Sierras rising up in the distance, as they themselves look down on the celebration of the mule.  Bishop Mule Days was first started in 1969 with a couple hundred attendees, and is now a major event for the small town off Route 395, welcoming over 30,000...

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The Mecate Rein

Posted by John Brand on

What is a mecate? The mecate is the rein portion of a hackamore, which is a type of headgear for the horse.  The unique part of the hackamore is that it does not have a bit, but uses a braided rawhide noseband called a bosal.  The bosal works on pressure points on the horse's face, nose, and chin. The mecate is a rope made from horse hair or soft feeling rope that serves as reins and lead rope, should one need. The Persians in 500 BC were one of the first to use a thick plaited noseband which was called...

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Custom Award Tack

Posted by John Brand on

Did you know that we have customized and personalized award tack available for just about any equestrian group, club, sport and discipline?  We have hair on bags, spur straps, wither straps, breast collars and slobber straps, and more. You can have your logo or event name laser engraved in the leather, making your tack specific to each event. Here are a few examples of what we can do: Is there anything we can help you or your group with this year? Give us a call or email us and we'll design just the right thing for you!

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Ropes and Lariats Used by the Vaqueros in the Old West

Posted by John Brand on

The Lassos were used by Vaquero’s to hunt wild cattle. Until the late 18th century, the Vaquero tied the lariat to the horse’s tail. But the development of heavier, more substantial saddles changed this technique. Vaquero’s began wrapping the end of the rope around the horn of their heavy saddles. This wrapping technique called “Dar la Vuelta” ("take a turn" in Spanish) passed over to the American cowboys, who corrupted the Spanish term into “dally” or “dally welter." Vaquero’s and the cowboys who copied the practice could slip the rope against the saddle horn and gain leverage against a roped...

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Spurs and Spur Straps

Posted by John Brand on

Spurs can be traced back to the Roman Legions of Julius Caesar . The Romans developed the spurs in order to have a way to steer their horses with their legs, while leaving their hands free to fight. These early spurs had a single sharp protrusion. The revolving rowel, used in western spurs today, probably originated in France.During the age of chivalry, spurs became a mark of rank. Gold or gilded spurs were only worn by knights or royalty. To further indicate their rank and prestige the knights would adorn their spurs with jewels, thus becoming works of art.In the...

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